September 26, 2014
"

Is Congress mad that the president didn’t ask for their permission? No, because if he did, then they’d have to go on the record with their opinions which could be used against them later if it turned out they were wrong. They’d rather sit back and criticize the outcome without ever having to do or say anything.

But isn’t that their job? Yes, but in their defense: they’re terrible at their jobs. But don’t feel bad for them. They want to be terrible at their jobs, and when you consider that they want to be terrible at their jobs, they’re doing an excellent job.

"

Seth Meyers (via traciglee)

Any questions about ISIS, Syria and congress?  

Seth breaks it down with this week’s Q+A.

(via latenightseth)

(via latenightseth)

12:29am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZsTZay1RiLW7-
  
Filed under: congress 
September 22, 2014

I think something got into my eyes when I saw this story because they started watering…a lot. So impressive and brave.

September 15, 2014
latimes:

Pools aren’t the water wasters some have made them out to be, water districts are learning during California’s drought.

latimes:

Pools aren’t the water wasters some have made them out to be, water districts are learning during California’s drought.

8:17am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZsTZay1QtaIUr
  
Filed under: drought 
September 12, 2014
mapsontheweb:

Literary map of London
twogunsalute:

Characters from over 250 novels plotted in the parts of London they either called home or spent a lot of time. Designed by graphic artist Dex working with interior designer Anna Burles.

mapsontheweb:

Literary map of London

twogunsalute:

Characters from over 250 novels plotted in the parts of London they either called home or spent a lot of time. Designed by graphic artist Dex working with interior designer Anna Burles.

(Source: i100.independent.co.uk)

12:19pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZsTZay1QegNqQ
  
Filed under: maps London 
September 12, 2014

I love how delighted Dave is by Billy Eichner.  Me too.

popculturebrain:

Billy Eichner and David Letterman play “Celebrity Child or Kentucky Derby Winner”

September 11, 2014

teamcoco:

CONAN Monologue 9/10/11

(via huffpostcomedy)

August 30, 2014

Great Flood of the Mississippi River, 1993
During the first half of 1993, the U.S. Midwest experienced unusually heavy rains. Much of the United States in the upper reaches of the Mississippi River drainage basin received more than 1.5 times their average rainfall in the first six months of the year, and parts of North Dakota, Iowa, and Kansas experienced more than double. The rains often arrived in very intense storms. Floods overwhelmed the elaborate system of dykes and other water control structures in the Mississippi River basin, leading to the greatest flood ever recorded on the Upper Mississippi. In St. Louis, the Mississippi remained above flood stage for 144 days between April 1 and September 30, 1993.
This image pair shows the area around St. Louis, Missouri, in August 1991 and 1993. The 1993 image was captured slightly after the peak water levels in this part of the Mississippi River. Flood waters had started to recede, but remained well above normal. This false-color image was created by combining infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths of light observed by the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument onboard the Landsat 5 satellite (TM bands 5, 4, and 2 respectively). Water appears dark blue, healthy vegetation is green, bare fields and freshly exposed soil are pink, and concrete is grey. The scale of flooding in the river basins of the Illinois, Missouri, and Mississippi Rivers in 1993 is immense. The deep pink scars in the 1993 image show where flood waters have drawn back to reveal the scoured land.
Other factors contributed to the severity of the flooding that year. The previous year had been cooler than average, which decreased evaporation from the soil and allowed the heavy rains to saturate the ground rapidly. In addition, widespread landcover change along rivers and streams has dramatically altered the natural flood control systems: wetlands that can absorb large amounts of water and release it slowly over time. The network of levees, canals, and dams in the Upper Mississippi Basin was unable to control the floods of 1993.
Spurred by this massive disaster, geologist Robert Brackenridge of Dartmouth College brought the tools of satellite remote sensing to bear on the issue of flood management, prediction, and monitoring. You can read about his work in the feature article High Water: Building A Global Flood Atlas.
NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data provided courtesy of the Landsat Project Science Office.
Instrument(s): Landsat 5 - TM

Great Flood of the Mississippi River, 1993

During the first half of 1993, the U.S. Midwest experienced unusually heavy rains. Much of the United States in the upper reaches of the Mississippi River drainage basin received more than 1.5 times their average rainfall in the first six months of the year, and parts of North Dakota, Iowa, and Kansas experienced more than double. The rains often arrived in very intense storms. Floods overwhelmed the elaborate system of dykes and other water control structures in the Mississippi River basin, leading to the greatest flood ever recorded on the Upper Mississippi. In St. Louis, the Mississippi remained above flood stage for 144 days between April 1 and September 30, 1993.

This image pair shows the area around St. Louis, Missouri, in August 1991 and 1993. The 1993 image was captured slightly after the peak water levels in this part of the Mississippi River. Flood waters had started to recede, but remained well above normal. This false-color image was created by combining infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths of light observed by the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument onboard the Landsat 5 satellite (TM bands 5, 4, and 2 respectively). Water appears dark blue, healthy vegetation is green, bare fields and freshly exposed soil are pink, and concrete is grey. The scale of flooding in the river basins of the Illinois, Missouri, and Mississippi Rivers in 1993 is immense. The deep pink scars in the 1993 image show where flood waters have drawn back to reveal the scoured land.

Other factors contributed to the severity of the flooding that year. The previous year had been cooler than average, which decreased evaporation from the soil and allowed the heavy rains to saturate the ground rapidly. In addition, widespread landcover change along rivers and streams has dramatically altered the natural flood control systems: wetlands that can absorb large amounts of water and release it slowly over time. The network of levees, canals, and dams in the Upper Mississippi Basin was unable to control the floods of 1993.

Spurred by this massive disaster, geologist Robert Brackenridge of Dartmouth College brought the tools of satellite remote sensing to bear on the issue of flood management, prediction, and monitoring. You can read about his work in the feature article High Water: Building A Global Flood Atlas.

NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data provided courtesy of the Landsat Project Science Office.

Instrument(s): Landsat 5 - TM

(Source: earth-as-art, via mapsontheweb)

August 29, 2014

unamusedsloth:

Nude Portraits series by photographer Trevor Christensen

(Source: unamusedsloth, via danforth)

August 28, 2014

popculturebrain:

Jimmy Kimmel reunites the women of ‘Friends' for a new scene

August 27, 2014
latenightseth:

You know the one.

latenightseth:

You know the one.